Archive for the ‘AWS’ Category

Benefits of using managed database as a service in the cloud

When using public cloud services for relational databases, you have two options:

  • IaaS solution – Install a database server on top of a virtual machine
  • PaaS solution – Connect to a managed database service

In the traditional data center, organizations had to maintain the operating system and the database by themselves.

The benefits are very clear – full control over the entire stack.

The downside – The organization needs to maintain availability, license cost and security (access control, patch level, hardening, auditing, etc.)

Today, all the major public cloud vendors offer managed services for databases in the cloud.

To connect to the database and begin working, all a customer needs is a DNS name, port number and credentials.

The benefits of a managed database service are:

  • Easy administration – No need to maintain the operating system (including patch level for the OS and for the database, system hardening, backup, etc.)
  • Scalability – The number of virtual machines in the cluster will grow automatically according to load, in addition to the storage space required for the data
  • High availability – The cluster can be configured to span across multiple availability zones (physical data centers)
  • Performance – Usually the cloud provider installs the database on SSD storage
  • Security – Encryption at rest and in transit
  • Monitoring – Built-in the service
  • Cost – Pay only for what you use

Not all features available on the on-premises version of the database are available on the PaaS version, and not all common databases are available as managed service of the major cloud providers.

Amazon RDS

Amazon managed services currently (as of April 2018) supports the following database engines:

Azure Managed databases

Microsoft Azure managed database services currently (as of April 2018) support the following database engines:

Google Cloud SQL

Google managed database services currently (as of April 2018) support the following database engines:

Oracle Database Cloud Service

Oracle managed database services currently (as of April 2018) support the following database engines:

Cloud Providers Service Limits

When working with cloud service providers, you may notice that at some point there are service / quota limitations.

Some limits are per account / subscription; some of them are per region and some limits are per pricing tier (free tier vs billable).

Here are some of the most common reasons for service / quota limitations:

  • Performance issues on the cloud provider’s side – loading a lot of virtual machines on the same data center requires a lot of resources from the cloud provider
  • Avoiding spikes in usage – protect from a situation where one customer consumes a lot of resources that might affect other customers and might eventually cause denial of service

For more information about default cloud service limits, see:

Default limitations can be changed by contacting the cloud service provider’s support and requesting a change to the default limitation.

For instructions on how to change the service limitations, see:

Best practices for using AWS access keys

AWS access keys enable us to use programmatic or AWS CLI services in a manner similar to using a username and password.

AWS access keys have account privileges – for better and for worse.

For example, if you save access keys (credentials) of a root account inside code, anyone who uses this code can totally damage your AWS account.

Many stories have been published about security breaches due to access key exposure, especially combined with open source version control systems such as GitHub and GitLab.

In order to avoid security breaches, here is a list of best practices for securing your environment when using access keys:

 

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